Piracy: The Perfect Patsy

Bloody pirates, always stealing the latest version of Photoshop!

No doubt by now you’ve heard about Crysis 2 being leaked recently. The sequel to the popular series by Crytek, Crysis 2 is slated to release on March 22 for North American audiences. A full working copy was out on February 11 on torrent sites, however, a full 39 days before its actual release. This was amidst Crytek’s recent announcement that they were canning early beta releases to GameStop employees on suspicion of piracy becoming a culprit for the PC version of the game and wanting all gamers to have a “fair shot” to play the game at the same time.

Crytek hasn’t held back on the development, going full-retard, releasing the following statement to Kotaku:

“Crytek has been alerted that an early incomplete, unfinished build of Crysis 2 has appeared on Torrent sites…Crytek and EA are deeply disappointed by the news. We encourage fans to support the game and the development team by waiting and purchasing the final, polished game on March 22.”

Crysis 2 is still in development and promises to be the ultimate action blockbuster as the series’ signature Nanosuit lets you be the weapon as you defend NYC from an alien invasion. Piracy continues to damage the PC packaged goods market and the PC development community.” [Link]

This is also amidst Crytek’s previous claims that the reason the Crysis series was no longer a PC exclusive was also because of piracy. In fact, to display their new-found behavior to alienate customers that payed for their bills to survive early on in their first development cycle, Crytek went ahead and made the online beta to Crysis 2 exclusive to the Xbox 360. They’re apparently flabbergasted that PC gamers have been less than pleased with their decisions. Gee, I wonder why.

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Giving PC gamers the middle finger

Ubisoft, a power-hitter publisher and developer in the video game industry, recently decided that PC gamers would not be receiving Prince of Persia DLC “for business reasons.” Of course, as you can see in that thread, PC gamers also decided to make a few business decisions of their own; such as never buying an Ubisoft product ever again. However, one can only wonder what this mystical “business reason” was so that PC gamers would be barred from enjoying a product they bought–or did they? Read more of this post